Electrode size and geometry in simulation

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neurosciencesado
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Electrode size and geometry in simulation

Post by neurosciencesado » Fri Jul 03, 2015 10:31 pm

Hey guys,

I am trying to simulate LFP values for different sizes or geometries of electrodes. Although I have searched so much, I have not find any plausible results so far. Is there a way to change electrode size or geometry in neuron simulation? If any, could you please post some related links or documents?

Thanks for your help and interest.

ted
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Re: Electrode size and geometry in simulation

Post by ted » Sat Jul 04, 2015 9:01 pm

NEURON doesn't do everything. One thing it doesn't do is tell you the geometry or time course of the extracellular field--that's up to you to provide. Analytical solutions are available (elsewhere) for certain simple electrode geometries and purely resistive extracellular conductive medium with simple boundary conditions. Anything more complicated that cannot be implemented by applying a simple rule such as superposition probably requires use of something like COMSOL or SIM4LIFE. If you are not familiar with any of this, it would be a good idea to collaborate with someone who is.

neurosciencesado
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Joined: Tue Jun 30, 2015 11:22 pm

Re: Electrode size and geometry in simulation

Post by neurosciencesado » Mon Jul 06, 2015 1:54 pm

Thank you for these useful information.

You also mentioned that "Analytical solutions are available (elsewhere) for certain simple electrode geometries and purely resistive extracellular conductive medium with simple boundary conditions."

Could you recommend any references for analytical solution for certain simple geometries?

ted
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Re: Electrode size and geometry in simulation

Post by ted » Mon Jul 06, 2015 2:43 pm

Standard texts on electrostatics abound. Unfortunately none are at my fingertips. Any physics or EE student who has had a basic course in electromagnetic theory should readily be able to give you a short list of currently available texts.

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